Buenavista

 

Buenavista

Income Classification: 4th Class
Congressional District: 3rd District
No. of Barangays: 37
Land Area: 16,135.0782 has. 
Population (NSO, May 1, 2010): 29,053
Registered Voters (COMELEC, May 9, 2016): 15,556

Newly Elected Local Officials (2016 Election)

Position
Mayor
Vice-Mayor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
LNB President
Local Official
Alexander N. Rivera
Ma. Remedios U. Rivera
Noel C. Cawa
Jorge Anonuevo
William T. Uy
Neneth Marasigan
Moises P. Geneblazo
Rolando R. Recto
Jaica L. Ricamora
Bonifacio C. Dosto
 
Political Party
United Nationalist Alliance
National Unity Party
United Nationalist Alliance
United Nationalist Alliance
United Nationalist Alliance
National Unity Party
Independent
AKBAYAN
LAKAS
LAKAS
 
Term
2nd
1st
2nd 
2nd 
2nd 
1st 
1st
3rd
1st
1st
 

 


About:
Buenavista has a total land area of 16,135.0792 hectares and situated in the Bondoc Peninsula. At present, Buenavista is a 4th class municipality. It has a population of 29,053. Based on the latest census of 2010. The municipality has 37 barangays, of which one (1) is urban and Thirty Six (36) are rural barangays. There are two (2) types of climate prevailing in the area, the dry season from later part of January to First week of May and rainy season from May to December till early part of January.

The original natives of the place are said to have originated from the Bicol Region. The main dialect is Filipino, although Bicolano, Visayan and Ilocano dialects are being commonly used in the barangays.

The majority of the inhabitants are Roman Catholics. The town fiesta is being held yearly on August 9-10 in honor of Saint Lawrence the Deacon and Martyr.

Historical Background:
Piris was its former name. It was a mere hamlet of the municipality of   Guinayangan, Province of Quezon, and remained as such for quite a number of years until it finally became a Municipality of Buenavista which is now its official name. Its  original name was Piri as engraved in the oldest church bell which was donated by one Don Jose Casal in the year 1866. It used to be located in the Sitio of Pinagbayanan situated in the western side of the Piris River which is about one and a half kilometers away from the present town site. This place became the choice of the founders who were a mixture of Bicolanos and Visayans to enable them to easily escape from the ferocious Moro raids that were rampant during the olden times. When the raids finally subsided, the Barrio of Piris was transferred to its present location but nobody could tell the exact date of its establishment thereat. The word Piri was changed to Piris and later renamed to Piris by the young generation for pronunciation facility.

The persons who are still remembered to have held leading positions in the locality were Apolinario Yakaba, Florentino Nepomuceno and Feliciano Roldan. A certain Pedro Aristotle, a Bicolano, who became totally blind after having some education and another man from Batangas, who is still remembered by the name of Senior Viscocho, were the district Maestros Municipals until the early part of the American Regime.

No historical sites, structures, buildings and old ruins were left, except the remaining parts of the posts of the so-called “Tribunal” building which was burned by the Spanish soldiers.

In the year 1918, an ex-Spanish soldier, by the name of Guillermo Gonzalves who was once the collector of tribune during the Spanish regime, came to Piris with an American surveyor named Mr. Walter Solomon and had a big portion of both the public and private lands in the locality surveyed. The ex-soldiers alleged that various cabezas of Piris were not able to settle the tribune under their respective responsibilities. A big agrarian conflict arose. The innocent land owners did not stopped in their pursuit in spite of the efforts exerted by Guillermo Gonzalves and his surveyor. The case was brought to the Court of Justice and remained unsettled for a period of 14 years. Finally, the Supreme Court ruled that the areas that were claimed rightfully be awarded to the claimants who were the actual occupants.

In October 1936, some civic minded natives launched the proposition of making the place a municipality. The residents signed a petition for the separation of Piris from the mother municipality. A group of seven (7) members was formed and commissioned to make representations with the Office of the Secretary of the Interior for the purpose. The group was composed of the late Feliciano Roldan, Mariano San Jose, Honorio Hutamares, Teodorico Dosto, Ciriaco Parraba, Atty. Antonio Pasta and Francisco San Jose. The outbreak of the second global war marked the failure of the offices concerned to convert the place into a regular municipality.

In 1942, the Department of the Interior organized the placed into a municipality under the permission of the Japanese government but the short-lived municipal government of Piris was disturbed by the guerillas. The town officials, as well as the affluent residents, evacuated to other places in the province. Its mayor, during the Japanese Regime, was the late Nicolas Roman who was appointed by the Japanese authorities. On December 19, 1942, the guerillas assembled the people in the Catholic Church and massacred the crowd in cold blood. Quite a number of civilian populations were killed. The year 1949 ushered in a new horizon for the people of Piris. Immediately after the election of the Honorable Gaudencio V. Vera to the Office of the Congressman for the Second District of Quezon Province, Mr. Francisco San Jose, a native and public teacher of the place, was instructed by Congressman Vera to help prepare the necessary papers pertaining to the separation of Piris from Guinayangan. When the papers were prepared, House Bill No. 83, which was sponsored by the energetic solon was passed by both House of Congress and became Republic Act No. 495. Under Proclamation No. 201 of His Excellency, President Elpidio Quirino, the corporate existence of Piris in the name of BUENAVISTA, became the 37th Municipality of Quezon Province, was fixed on the 26th day of August 1950. An inauguration was celebrated by the town people under the leadership of Domingo Reyes and of the late Mr. Yao Ching Kio, a wealthy businessman of the place, with Congressman Vera as the guest of honor. When the Municipality of Buenavista was inaugurated on August 26, 1950, it belonged to seventh class. Six (6) months thereafter, due to some increase in revenue, it rose to sixth class. The late Francisco Falqueza was appointed Municipal Mayor and held office beginning August 26, 1950 up to December 31, 1951.

Geographic Location:
Buenavista, Quezon is located on the Eastern part of Quezon Province. It belongs to the 3rd Congressional District of Quezon Province otherwise know as Bondoc Peninsula. It is bounded on the North by Guinayangan, Quezon, on the South by San Narciso, on the Western part by Lopez and  Catanauan and on the East by Ragay Gulf towards Bicol Region. The municipality is about 249 km. South East of Metro Manila and about 217 km. southeast of the Provincial Capital, the City of Lucena. It is accessible by land via Lopez and Catanauan, Quezon and by sea via Guinayangan, Quezon.

Major Income Sources: Agriculture

Tourist Destinations: Beaches at Barangays Cabong, Cawa and Mabutag

Special Events/Festivals: Town Fiesta (August 9-10), Mayflower Festival (May 30), Foundation (August 26)

Contact Information:
Address: Municipal Building, Brgy. Poblacion, Buenavista, Quezon
Mobile: 0928-552-3977
Email Address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. >



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