Padre Garcia

 

Padre Garcia

Income Classification: 2nd Class
Congressional District: 4th District 
No. of Barangays: 18
Land Area: 4,093 has. 
Population (CBMS, May, 2015): 43,330
Registered Voters (COMELEC, November 2015): 28,018

Newly Elected Local Officials (2016 Election)

Position
Mayor
Vice-Mayor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
LNB President
Local Official
Michael Angelo Capuloy Rivera
Noel Caraos Cantos
Emilio Munlawin Tapalla
Mark Lester Gener Manalo
Rodel Calingasan Pesigan
Nilo Cubero Dimaculangan
Ferdinand Guera Villar
Cristian Pasia Marasigan
Monaliza Gomez Ceria
Renzel Mae Parungao Maala
Nicetas B. Amante
Political Party
Liberal Party
Liberal Party
Liberal Party
Liberal Party 
Liberal Party
Liberal Party
Nationalist People's Coalition
Liberal Party
Liberal Party 
Nationalist People's Coalition 
 
Term
1st
2nd
2nd 
2nd 
1st 
1st 
2nd 
1st
1st
1st 
1st

 


About:
The Municipality of Padre Garcia was formerly part of the town of Rosario and served as its seat of government since its resettlement in the mid-18th century Spanish era up to 1902 at the time of the Philippine-American War. It was the third site in which original settlers were from the “pueblo” communities of the now Lobo-San Juan area (Late 1600) and the 2nd resettlement was the Kansahayan River area that is now Taysan (Early 1700). The cause of inland migration was to seek refuge from the Moro incursions intent on piracy and slavery. They settled in the surrounding area of the Tubig ng Bayan River (also known as Pamintahan River) which is now the Barangay Poblacion. A church was built after the patroness – Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary. The town of Santo Rosario flourished and had established a Parish by 1776.

In November 1899 during the Philippine-American War, when the struggles of the First Philippine Republic proved bleak and difficult, conventional warfare shifted into guerrilla type conflict. Responsible for command operations of Batangas and Laguna Province was American General J. Franklin Bell whose counter-insurgency tactics of scorched earth and “hamletting” policy proved effective against Filipino insurgents under General Miguel Malvar. The latter assumed the presidency of the Republic upon Aguinaldo’s capture on March 23, 1901. The North-eastern part of Batangas was a major staging area for Malvar. General Bell ordered the entire population of the provinces of Batangas and Laguna to gather into small areas within the poblacion of their respective towns by December 25, 1901. The people of Rosario were relocated four (4) kilometres to the south near Tombol Hill to a reconcentrado (concentration) camp for civilians. Everything left behind, houses, gardens, carts, poultry and animals, were burned.This was the 4th and present site of the Municipality of Rosario.

At the waning of hostilities, the Parish Priest of the Most Holy Rosary Parish, Fr. Eulalio Mea, after settling with the populace in the American camp in 1902 returned to the ruins of the former site on June 1905. Thus a new Rosario and an Old Rosario or Lumangbayan came into existence. For the coming decades, Lumangbayan came to be the spiritual center of Rosario.

In 1924, a group of prominent residents led by Graciano Recto, former councilor of the local government of Rosario called for the creation of a new town separate from Rosario to be composed of Lumangbayan and twelve adjoining barrios. And it was after World War 2 that the National Government agreed with this sentiment. On October 11, 1949, President Elpidio Quirino signed into law the creation of the Municipality of Padre Garcia to take effect on December 1, 1949. Named after a great Filipino theologian, writer and defender of Filipino rights and that of Jose Rizal’s Noli Me Tangere, Padre Vicente Garcia was a native of Maugat, Padre Garcia, Batangas. The municipality was then led by Jose Pesigan and Rustico Recto as mayor and vice mayor respectively.

To ensure town’s stability, the need to generate employment for the citizens and funds for the town were the top most priorities of the local government. Hence, the elected council of the Padre Garcia municipal founded the cattle market or “bakahan” in 1952. This move caused an unmediated competition against the neighboring towns’ livestock market. Furthermore, it resulted in rivalry, daunt and aggression at times.

The cattle market was known to be the Lumang Bayan’s market back in 1945. At first, it was unsuccessful but due to the night and day discussion and invitation to traders, the trading capacity of the cattle market slowly grew and, thus, expanded. The town of Rosario was threatened to the growth of Padre Garcia’s cattle market, which resulted in enforcing the traders to their market by blocking the crossroad leading to Padre Garcia. Also, cattle rustling were elevated. As a result, competition resulted to violence before Mayor Pesigan came in between the towns. Still, the traders prefer the product of Padre Garcia’s Cattle Market and settling on another route, yet long, just to evade Rosario. With the coalition of the council led by Mayor Pesigan, Vice Mayor Narciso Calingasan and the town’s councilors and the home front, cowhand to the employees, with vigor perseverance, enthusiasm, dedication and commitment to form a strategic method for the growth and development of the Cattle Market, Padre Garcia triumph in the advent of 1960.

When the founding leader, Mayor Pesigan, of the “bakahan” turn in his position to Mayor Eugenio Din, the site of the “bakahan”, moved at the corner of the roads to Lipa City and Brgy. San Miguel in 1964. Violence took place at the aggressive action of the Rosario to take back the loss in their livestock market which led to the assassination of Mayor Eugenio Din in 1972. In the alert of losing the cattle market amidst the competition of towns in the Batangas, Rufino Bituin took the seat.

Over with the Ministry of Agriculture, National Government under Martial Law put out an Administrative Order No.1 series of 1973 or known as “Livestock Auction Market” (LAM). Padre Garcia’s cattle market did not quick to grasp the sudden changed which resulted in declining their cattle industry. Mayor Bituin consulted the provincial agriculture office to seek remedy in their hostile situation. A command was issued and enforced by the Minister Arturo Tangco of the Ministry of Agriculture that the Padre Garcia will be the center of Livestock Auction Market. Thus, the cattle market in Pedro Garcia was then succeeded and became the biggest auction market in Southern Tagalog.

Historical Background:
On the eastern portion of Batangas Province, bordering the municipality of San Antonio, Quezon lies the town of Padre Garcia, small as is it with a population of roughly 26,000 and land area of approximately 40.93 square kilometers, it has a unique and fascinating history intricately interwoven in its perennial struggle for automy.

History tells us that the town of Rosario was originally founded and established during the Spanish regime in what is now Pinagbayanan, a coastal barrio of Taysan, Batangas. Its relics, still to be found there, is a vivid and glowing testimonial to the godliness, industry and perseverance of our forbears.

Peace and tranquility reigned in this frontier town until the Mohamedan marauders from the south began to wrought havoc to it, plunder its villages and abduct and rape its beautiful belles. These savage depredations continued unbated that the council of elders convened and agreed to thrust into the hinterlands to found a new settlement in the very place where they will have finished reciting on their way the Holy Rosary for nine consecutive times.

So, on that fateful day under the scorching heat of the sun, our four fathers, stooping with the heavy burden on their backs, trekked into the wilderness in search for their homes. Divinely inspired, their search ultimately fell on the present site of Padre Garcia. The town of Rosario continued to exit hereon for a long time.

With the advent of Americans, a certain Captain Brown and his forces at bayonet points compelled the residents to go and settle an abundant supply of fresh and clean water coming from Tombol Hill. Since then the old town was relegated to a more barrio, officially named Sambat but popularly called Lumangbayan.

The largest barrio of the new town, it played its role as dutiful daughter by paying religiously its realty and water-right taxes. Nevertheless, Rosario in return acted with an apathy and neglect if not ill-concealed contempt. To add insult to injury, it constantly designated never-do-good, indolent and influential councilors to represent the barrio in the town’s law-making body. At worst the barrio was not represent oftentimes.

For their intense love of freedom and foregoing deplorable state of affairs, the residents of Lumangbayan struggled persistently to re-establish their town. Towards this goal, they unlisted among others, the said of late Don Claro M. Recto expectedly, the great dissenter, being always in the minority did not reap any success. It is noteworthy to mention that under his sponsorship the untimely demise of late President Manuel Roxas, known to be a close friend of Recto.

Meanwhile, in the local elections of 1947, several prominent residents of the barrio ran for councilor with the end in view of correcting the aforementioned abuses and injustices. A couple could have won but unfortunately they were cheated. These facts proved to be a blessing in disguise for it revived and spurred with renewed vigor and vitality the people’s agitation for self-government.

Then came the year 1949, as per ahis commitment, the late President Elpidio A. Quirino, by a history making stoke of his pen on October 11, 1949, created under Executive Order No. 279 the town of Padre Garcia from Lumangbayan and several adjoining barrios. In passing it will be recalled that the late Atty. Luis M. Kasilag also worked hard in the creation of the town and that it was then Senator Macario Peralta, Jr. who interceded and sponsored to the President the approval of petition.

This town was named after Reverend Father Vicente Garcia, a native of Maugat one of its barrios. A learned priest, he became famous as a brilliant professor in theology in the University of Santo Tomas in Manila and defender of Dr. Rizal’s Noli Me Tangere.

Through the years, this town has made remarkable strikes in progress both under Nacionalista and Liberal Administration.

A happy conglomeration and blending of the nature, characteristics and traits of the inhabitants of the surrounding towns, the people of Padre Garcia possess the aristocracy and piety of Lipeños, the courage and temperament of San Antonio, the generosity and hospitality of Rosario and the passiveness and complacency of Ibaan. Thus the cause of the town’s cases of breakdown in peace and order.

As in the past, the town of Padre Garcia, will continue to play its role not only among its sister municipalities of Batangas but also its counterparts throughout the length and breadth of the Philippines.

Geographic Location:
The Municipality of Padre Garcia, Batangas is located at latitude of 13 52' 42'' and longitude of 121 12' 55'' at the south-eastern mouth of Luzon Island along the eastern part of Batangas Province. It is situated east of the Lipa City, West of the Municipalities of San Antonio, Quezon, South of Lipa City and North of the Municipality of Rosario. It lies within the northwest slopes of the San Juan and northeast of Ibaan. Padre Garcia is an Agro-Tourism Municipality. It is known for being the “Cattle Trading Capital of the Philippines”. Padre Garcia is a 2nd class municipality and Partially Urban.

Major Income Sources: Agriculture

Tourist Destinations: Livestock Auction Market, Most Holy Rosary Parish Church, Bawi Eco Trail, Silver Arrow

Special Events/Festivals: Kabakahan Festival

Contact Information:
Address: Municipal Hall, Poblacion, Padre Garcia, Batangas
Phone: (043) 515-9207
Fax: (043) 515-9207
Email Address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: http://www.padregarcia.ph


Programs Portal

            

         LGU 201 Profile   

            

 
Knowledge Products
 
DILG Intranet

     DILG GovMail     DILG Central Intranet     DILG IV-A Records Tracking System