Quezon

 

Quezon

Income Classification: 5th Class
Congressional District: 4th District
No. of Barangays: 24
Land Area: 7,122.20 has. 
Population (NSO, May 1, 2010): 17,998
Registered Voters (COMELEC): 9,528

Newly Elected Local Officials (2016 Election)

Position
Mayor
Vice-Mayor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
LNB President
Local Official
Cherry P. Clacio
Magsaysay V. Oliveros
Pedrito Alibarbar Sr.
Boots Rodriguez
Juan Escolano
Helen Fullante
Zaldy Bayan
Anastacio Sasot
Wilma Isla
Kevin Mendoza
Alejandro S. Clacio
Political Party
National Unity Party
Nationalist People's Coalition 
Liberal Party
National Unity Party
Independent
National Unity Party
Independent
Liberal Party
National Unity Party
Liberal Party
 
Term
1st
1st
2nd
1st 
3rd
2nd 
1st
2nd
3rd
1st
 

 


About:
The Municipality of Quezon was located at the southern tip of Alabat Island away from the maddening crowds of city life where one can find a perfect place to commune with nature. Travelling from Gumaca Port across the bay to the Port of Quezon would take about forty-five minutes or more depending on the weather condition. Every year on the first week of May, the municipality celebrates its town anniversary and feast of the Holy Cross which people actively participates in its town’s activities. The most colorful and the most symbolic event in a three day celebration is the fluvial procession that serves as thanksgiving rites of fishermen, boat owners and seafarers. Symbolically, the Holy Cross leads the people in this procession as it has guided the course of history of this small fishing community across the serene but sometimes hostile Lamon Bay.

Historical Background:
About the time the Philippine Archipelago was discovered by the Spaniards, there were already inhabitants in the place; the exact date of their settlements was unrecorded. Those people have dark brown complexion, though few have lighter, their height was about four feet and a half, commonly robust, semi-nomade, they commonly wandered along the coast where they gather most of their goods. Their mode of life and settlements was similar to the common Malay. They were also called “Dumagats” because they spent most of their time in the sea. Further inland there was a little village formed by wandering Malays from which their origin was unknown. They were distinctly separated from the Dumagats who wandered along the coast. They had already carried some trade with the people from Atimonan, Mauban and Binangonan.

In the earlier part of the year 1672, a boat bearing Franciscan friar was drifted by the outgoing current from Atimonan to a village from this town. Fray Tirso de Santa Maria and ten members of the party explored the place and discovered the fertility of the soil and site for a prospective town. Immediately they returned to Atimonan and summoned a congregation for the purpose of transfer. They invited some families from Mauban and set sail for Silangan. Upon arrival to their destination, they found a village and constructed a church. The ruins of this church can still be seen under the roots of a great Balete tree that grew in it. Several hundreds of houses were constructed, some were made of stones, the ruins of which were now entirely covered by the roots of the coconut trees that were planted. They lasted for fifteen years and these friars were also the priests and governadorcillos at that time. The town was built covering the southern part of the island, fortifications was built by enormous labor and money, so no strong port was built to protect the people from pirate attacks which was quite numerous by that time. In 1688, the friars guarded the coastline along Lamon Bay, they chose a site near the river just opposite to the west of the established town, and today it was known as the town of “Quezon”.

The people of Gumaca under fray Diego de Alcala had built stone fortifications and watch tower against pirates who become discouraged and by the middle of 18th century the moro pirates stopped their perilous adventure. More people began to cross the channel and settled in the forgotten town. More and more people established their homes permanently in the barrio until there were about a thousand inhabitants when the revolution against the Spanish dominations commenced. They called the place Silangan signifying the rising sun.

Quezon, Quezon was formally instituted as a town on January 1, 1914 naming the locality after the most honored son of the province, then Commissioner Manuel L. Quezon, through executive order no. 001 series of 1913 issued by Governor Burton Harrison composing 9 barrios. As the town progressed and population increased additional barrios were established. Quezon, Quezon now is composed of 18 rural barangays and 6 urban/poblacion barangays.

Geographic Location:
Quezon, Quezon is bounded on the South by the Municipality of Gumaca on the Eastern part by Calauag, Lamon Bay while on the Western part of the Municipality by Plaridel and Atimonan and Pacific Ocean on the Northern part. It covers a total land area 7,122.20 hectares of which majority of the land are dedicated for agriculture.

Major Income Sources: Agriculture, Fishing

Tourist Destinations: Falls and Coastal areas of Barangay Sabang, Quezon, Quezon

Special Events/Festivals: Yubakan Festival (May 1), Quezon Got Talent (April 24-May 1), Tindahan ng mga Juana or Women’s Market (May 1-2, 2015)

Contact Information:
Address: Municipal Hall, Quezon, Quezon
Email Address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.



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