Santa Maria

 

Santa Maria

Income Classification: 4th Class
Congressional District: 4th District
No. of Barangays: 25
Land Area: 12,841.5 has. 
Population (NSO, 2010): 32,490
Registered Voters (COMELEC, January 2016): 17,950

Newly Elected Local Officials (2016 Election)

Position
Mayor
Vice-Mayor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
Councilor
LNB President
Local Official
Atty. Antonio M. Carolino, MPA
Virginia P. Tuazon
Christened Jayson A. Cuento
Alejandro Aguja
Atty. Norlito Briones
Eduardo Montales
Honorio Landicho
Mario Palicpic Jr.
Edgardo Penicate
Anselmo Cordova
Felix D. Manigbas
Political Party
Nacionalista Party
Nacionalista Party
United Nationalist Alliance
Nacionalista Party
Nacionalista Party
Nacionalista Party
Nacionalista Party
Nacionalista Party
Independent
Nacionalista Party
 
Term
1st
3rd 
2nd
2nd
3rd
1st 
3rd
3rd
1st 
3rd
 

 


About:
Tail-end and landlocked, Santa Maria stands as the Rice Granary of Laguna Province. Rich in unspoken history with not much left physical proof of over four centuries of existence, Santa Maria has kept building on and laying new foundations for progress. Aside from the promising bounty, the rich natural resources in the municipality can also boast of the grand beauty for tourism. Matched with the human ingenuity, this tourism potential could offer feasible economic opportunities on top of employment to private sector and government service. Getting agriculture, tourism and human resources to work together would enhance productivity and spell an increase in the per capita income. 

Historical Background:
Santa Maria, founded in 1602, was first named Santa Maria de Caboan. Caboan came from the Tagalog word Kabuhuan which means bamboo thickets. Buho is a bamboo genus growing abundantly in the town. During this period Santa Maria was known to be part of Morong and here people gathered to trade and barter with pandan mats, wares, livestock and other farm produce with the Chinese merchants. Aetas would also be seen selling their clay pots, wild honey, medicinal herbs and rootstocks.

History has it that a couple found an image of the Blessed Mother at a place near the river. The first Spanish friar assigned here, Reverendo Padre Antonio de la Llave,  began to build a church, at the site where the image was found. The town came to be called San Miguel, in honor of the Archangel Michael, the first patron saint. Since Christianity was well embraced by the locals, they were all too willing to help in its construction, selling their harvest to finance what they considered a holy task To this day, this church still stands. Residents believed that Pdr. Antonio de la Llave was responsible for establishing this village into a town and in naming it San Miguel de Caboan in 1602 In 1613, Rvd. Padre Geronimo Vasquez changed  San Miguel de Caboan into how it is called now, Santa Maria.

The town of Santa Maria was later on attached as a barrio of its neighboring town, Mabitac, Laguna. However, in the year 1901, through the  Proclamation by the Gen. Otis Commission, Santa Maria was finally declared a separate municipality in the province of Laguna.

Over the long years of existence, the locals were able to establish the major economic driver which is agriculture. Though it meant so much hardwork with their bare hands, they kept on clearing and cultivating the rich plains. Coconuts, bananas, crops, coffee and many fruit bearing trees are pounded as rice farms were irrigated by the rivers. God endowed the town with rich natural resources making for bountiful are harvest. A portrait of modest life, Santa Maria emerged to earn the title Rice Granary in the entire province of Laguna. To partake in the bountiful production of food to sustain man’s life is such a blessing from heaven. To this, a thanksgiving is observed and celebrated in a feast called Marilag Festival.

Geographic Location:
Santa Maria, a landlocked municipality of Laguna, is located at the tail end of the province, about 37 kilometers from the provincial capital, Santa Cruz. It is approximately 99 kilometers from Manila, the capital of the country, via Antipolo, Rizal. The town is surrounded by the  Sierra Madre Mountain Ranges cut across by the Marikina-Infanta Road, formerly known as Marcos Highway. This physical linkage aims to connect the marine-life rich province of Quezon, the site of the proposed International Port Silangan Railways Express 2000 (MARILAQUE Railways), to the National Capital Region (NCR), in order to create a larger corridor for regional socio-economic development. The Municipality is bounded on the North East by the municipalities of Infant and Real, Quezon, on the Northwest by the municipalities of Pilillia and Tanay, Rizal and Southeast by Famy, Laguna with geographical coordinates of 14.44deg to 14.57deg North latitude and 121.30deg to 121.51deg East longitude. 

Major Income Sources: Agriculture

Tourist Destinations: Marilag Falls

Special Events/Festivals: Santa Maria Day/Foundation Day, Marilag Festival, Town Fiesta

Contact Information:
Address: Municipal Hall, Real Velasquez Street. Poblacion II, Sta. Maria, Laguna
Phone: (049) 501-1611
Fax: (049) 501-1611
Email Address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.



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